Do you struggle to get the desired conversion rate that you want with your follow up emails? Are you searching for ways to wean customers into loyal, long-term relationships with your business? Keeping communication at the forefront of customer service and marketing should be a key aspect of any successful business—and this starts from the moment of contact. Using effective, personalized follow up emails can help grow your business relationship in a way that will lead to higher conversions. Whatever type of product or service that you’re selling, these strategies are essential for improving your bottom line and keeping those customers coming back for more.

Read on to learn how to write an engaging follow up email that will help drive success from start to finish!

The importance of follow-up emails in converting leads

email marketing

You've probably heard the phrase "the fortune is in the follow-up". It's true: following up with potential customers and clients through email can be a great way to increase your conversion rate, especially if you do it right. If you’re wondering how to write a follow-up email that stands out from all of the others, we’ve got you covered. In this blog post, we'll walk you through tried-and-true tips for crafting effective follow-up emails so that you can get better results with your outreach campaigns!

Follow-up emails are an important part of the sales and marketing process because they allow you to stay in touch with potential leads and customers. By following up after an initial contact or interaction, you can keep your company top-of-mind and demonstrate your commitment to helping the recipient achieve their goals.

Follow-up emails also give you the opportunity to address any questions or concerns that the recipient may have, and provide additional information that could help them make a purchasing decision. They can also help you gauge the level of interest in your product or service, and adjust your approach accordingly.

The benefits of a well-written follow-up email

follow up email

There are several benefits to writing a well-written follow-up email:

  1. It demonstrates professionalism and attention to detail. By taking the time to craft a thoughtful and well-written follow-up email, you show the recipient that you value their time and are committed to providing a high-quality experience.
  2. It can help build trust and credibility. A well-written follow-up email can help establish you as a trusted and reliable resource, which can be particularly important for building relationships with potential customers.
  3. It can help increase conversions. A well-written follow-up email can provide the information and incentives that a recipient needs to take the next step in the sales process. It can also help overcome objections and address any concerns that the recipient may have.
  4. It can help improve customer satisfaction. By following up in a timely and professional manner, you can show the recipient that you are responsive and dedicated to meeting their needs. This can help improve overall customer satisfaction and lead to repeat business and positive word-of-mouth recommendations.

Tips for writing a successful follow-up email

email marketing

Personalize the subject line

Personalizing the subject line of a follow-up email can be an effective way to grab the recipient's attention and increase the chances that they will open and read your email. Here are a few tips for personalizing the subject line of your follow-up email:

  1. Use the recipient's name: Including the recipient's name in the subject line can make the email feel more personal and tailored to their interests.
  2. Mention a specific topic or action: If the recipient took a specific action (e.g. attending a webinar, requesting more information), mention it in the subject line to remind them of your previous interaction and why they should continue to engage with your company.
  3. Use relevant keywords: Including relevant keywords in the subject line can help the email stand out in the recipient's inbox and show that it is relevant to their needs and interests.
  4. Avoid using spammy or salesy language: Subject lines that are overly salesy or use spammy language (e.g. "Free money!") are likely to be flagged as spam and may not even reach the recipient's inbox. Instead, focus on creating a subject line that is informative and relevant to the recipient.

Keep the email short and to the point

Keeping a follow-up email short and to the point can help increase the chances that the recipient will read it and take the desired action. Here are a few tips for keeping your follow-up email short and focused:

  1. Identify the main goal of the email: Before writing your follow-up email, clearly identify the main goal or purpose of the email. This will help you stay focused and ensure that all of the information you include is relevant and necessary.
  2. Use bullet points or numbered lists: Bullet points and numbered lists can help break up the text and make it easier for the recipient to quickly scan and understand the main points.
  3. Keep the email concise: Avoid using long, wordy sentences and paragraphs. Instead, use clear and concise language to get your message across.
  4. Use subheadings to break up the text: Subheadings can help break up the text and make it easier for the recipient to understand the main points of the email.
  5. Include a clear call to action: Make sure to include a clear call to action (e.g. "Contact us to schedule a demo," "Click here to learn more") so the recipient knows what the next step is.

Include a clear call to action

email call to action

Including a clear call to action (CTA) in a follow-up email is important because it tells the recipient what you want them to do next. A CTA can be as simple as "click here to learn more" or "contact us to schedule a demo," but it should be specific and actionable.

Here are a few tips for including a clear CTA in your follow-up email:

  1. Make the CTA actionable: Use verbs that encourage the recipient to take action, such as "click," "register," "sign up," "contact," etc.
  2. Use strong and descriptive language: Use strong and descriptive language to clearly convey the benefits of taking the desired action. For example, instead of "click here," use "click here to learn more about our industry-leading products."
  3. Include a sense of urgency: If appropriate, include a sense of urgency in your CTA to encourage the recipient to act quickly. For example, "Sign up now to receive a special discount" or "Contact us today to schedule a demo."
  4. Place the CTA prominently: Make sure the CTA is easy to spot and not buried at the bottom of the email. You can use bold or larger text, or place it in a prominent location such as above the fold or after a relevant paragraph.

Overall, the goal is to make the CTA clear and actionable, and to give the recipient a compelling reason to take the desired action.

Use a friendly and professional tone

Using a friendly and professional tone in a follow-up email is important because it helps to establish a positive relationship with the recipient and shows that you are approachable and trustworthy.

Here are a few tips for using a friendly and professional tone in your follow-up email:

  1. Use a conversational tone: Avoid using formal, stuffy language. Instead, try to use a tone that is friendly and approachable, as if you were having a conversation with the recipient.
  2. Use personal pronouns: Using personal pronouns such as "you" and "your" can help make the email feel more personal and tailored to the recipient.
  3. Show enthusiasm: Showing enthusiasm for your product or service can help convey your passion and excitement to the recipient. However, avoid coming across as overly salesy or pushy.
  4. Use proper grammar and spelling: It's important to use proper grammar and spelling in any business communication, as it helps to establish credibility and professionalism.

Use bullet points to highlight key points

Using bullet points to highlight key points in a follow-up email can be an effective way to make the email easier to read and understand. Bullet points allow the recipient to quickly scan the email and understand the main points, which can be particularly helpful if they are short on time.

Here are a few tips for using bullet points effectively in your follow-up email:

  1. Use bullet points to list out key points: Use bullet points to list out key points or takeaways from your previous interaction (e.g. a sales pitch, webinar, etc.). This can help remind the recipient of the main points and why they should continue to engage with your company.
  2. Keep the bullet points short and to the point: Avoid using long, wordy bullet points. Instead, focus on making each point as clear and concise as possible.
  3. Use parallel structure: Use parallel structure in your bullet points to make them easier to read and understand. For example, if you start one bullet point with a verb, start the others with verbs as well.
  4. Use bullet points sparingly: Avoid using too many bullet points in a single email, as it can make the email feel cluttered and overwhelming. Instead, use them to highlight the most important points.

Overall, the goal is to use bullet points to make the key points of the email easy to understand and remember.

Include social proof

Including social proof, such as testimonials, in a follow-up email can be an effective way to build credibility and persuade the recipient to take the desired action. Social proof refers to the idea that people are more likely to trust and follow the actions of others, especially if those others are similar to them.

Here are a few tips for including social proof in your follow-up email:

  1. Use testimonials from satisfied customers: Including testimonials from satisfied customers can help build credibility and show the recipient that others have had positive experiences with your company.
  2. Use quotes or case studies: Including quotes or case studies from satisfied customers can be particularly effective, as they provide specific examples of how your product or service has helped others.
  3. Include numbers or statistics: Including numbers or statistics that demonstrate the effectiveness of your product or service can be a powerful way to build credibility and persuade the recipient.
  4. Use logos or badges: If your company has won any awards or certifications, consider including logos or badges in the email to show the recipient that you are a trusted and reputable company.

The goal is to use social proof to build credibility and persuade the recipient to take the desired action.

Examples of successful follow-up emails

There are several types of follow-up emails that businesses can send to subscribers, depending on their goals and the stage of the relationship. Here are a few examples:

Confirmation and welcome email: This email is sent immediately after someone subscribes to your mailing list. It should confirm their subscription and thank them for joining. It can also include a welcome offer, such as a discount code or free resource.

Onboarding email series: This is a series of emails sent over a period of days or weeks, designed to help new subscribers get to know your business and what you have to offer. These emails can include information about your products or services, customer testimonials, and tips or tutorials related to your industry.

Re-engagement email: These emails are sent to subscribers who haven't opened or clicked on your emails in a while. The goal is to re-engage these subscribers and encourage them to continue receiving your emails. This type of email can include a special offer or exclusive content.

Abandoned cart email: This type of email is sent to subscribers who have added items to their online shopping cart but have not completed their purchase. The email should include a reminder of the items left in their cart and potentially an additional offer to incentivize them to complete their purchase.

Upsell and cross-sell email: These emails are sent to subscribers who have previously purchased from you to try and sell additional or complementary products or services. This can increase customer lifetime value.

Post-purchase email: These emails are sent after a customer has made a purchase to thank them for their business and ask for feedback or a review on the product or service.

Win-back email: These emails are sent to customers who haven't purchase in a while, to try and win them back as a customer. These emails are meant to remind them of your products or services and incentivize them to make a purchase.

Common mistakes to avoid when sending a follow up email

The same way follow up emails can be beneficial to your business they can play a counterproductive role as well when misused, it’s important to follow some basic guidelines when sending follow up emails in order to make sure you don’t make any avoidable mistakes that might jeopardize your chances

Sending too many follow-up emails

Sending too many follow-up emails is a mistake that many businesses make. It's easy to get caught up in the excitement of making a sale or building a relationship, but bombarding your subscribers with too many emails can actually have the opposite effect.

When someone subscribes to your mailing list, they expect to receive emails from you on a regular basis. However, if you send too many emails, it can be overwhelming for the subscriber and they may start to tune you out. This is especially true if the majority of the emails you send are focused on trying to sell something.

So, how many is too many? It really depends on the person you are emailing, the type of relationship you have with them and the type of email you are sending. In general, it's a good idea to stick to a regular schedule, such as once a week, so that your subscribers know when to expect an email from you.

Another issue with sending too many emails is that it can cause your open and click-through rates to drop. If people start to feel like they are getting too many emails, they may start to ignore them or even mark them as spam. This can harm your email deliverability and make it harder for your emails to reach the inbox.

Another thing you want to avoid is sending follow-up emails too frequently. People have busy schedules and inboxes, bombarding them with multiple follow-ups can make you look pushy and unprofessional. You don't want to give them the impression you are not respecting their time.

Being pushy or aggressive in the email

Being pushy or aggressive in your follow-up emails can be a major turn-off for your subscribers and can harm your relationship with them. It can also negatively impact the effectiveness of your emails by decreasing open and click-through rates, and even causing your subscribers to unsubscribe.

When it comes to follow-up emails, it's important to remember that you are trying to build a relationship with your subscribers, not just make a sale. By being pushy or aggressive, you risk damaging that relationship and turning off your subscribers.

Instead, you should focus on building trust and providing value. This means providing helpful information, offering exclusive deals, and being personable in your emails. When the time is right, and the subscriber is ready to make a purchase, they will be more likely to do so because they trust and value your brand.

One of the best ways to avoid being pushy or aggressive in your follow-up emails is to put yourself in your subscriber's shoes. Think about what you would want to receive in an email and what would turn you off.

Also, it's important to be patient. Not everyone is ready to buy or meet at the same time. Follow up is an important part of the sales process but it should be done in a way that feels natural, helpful, and not overwhelming.

Failing to address the recipient's specific needs or concerns

Failing to address the recipient's specific needs or concerns in your follow-up emails can lead to a lack of engagement and interest from your subscribers. It can also make it seem like you don't really understand their needs or care about their concerns, which can harm your relationship with them.

When you meet someone at a networking event or acquire a new subscriber, it's important to take note of their specific needs or concerns. This information can be used to tailor your follow-up emails in a way that addresses those needs or concerns directly. This shows that you were listening, care about their specific situation and can provide a solution.

An example would be if a subscriber has shown interest in a specific product or service, your follow-up email could include information about that product or service, such as its features, benefits, and any promotions or deals that may be available.

Additionally, if a subscriber has expressed concern about a specific issue, your follow-up email could address that concern head-on and provide them with a solution. For example, if they were worried about a product's warranty, you can provide more information or give them the phone number to contact customer service.

The key is to tailor your follow-up emails in a way that addresses the recipient's specific needs or concerns, rather than sending a generic message that doesn't really apply to them.

Another thing you should consider is using automation tools to segment your mailing list and send targeted follow-up emails to specific groups of subscribers based on their interests and behavior. This way you can make sure you are providing relevant information to your subscribers.

Conclusion

In conclusion, following up with leads via email is an important part of the sales process. It's a way to keep your business top of mind with potential customers and increase your chances of closing a sale. A well-crafted follow-up email should be personalized, timely, provide value, and clearly states the call-to-action for the next step. But, it's not only about sending emails, but also tracking and measuring your efforts to optimize your follow-up strategy. By following up effectively, you'll be able to build stronger relationships with your leads and close more deals. So, don't be afraid to reach out and remind your leads of your business, it's not pushy, it's just smart business.